3 Chemistry Lessons – Gaining Conversational Intelligence

By Judith E. Glaser

 

We are all familiar with the ‘chemistry’ factor in relationships and the chemical attraction metaphor; however, we are now learning that our insights about the chemical nature of relationships and conversations are more than a metaphor—they are a reality!

 

For many decades, I’ve been intrigued by the chemical impacts—both positive and negative—that conversations have on us.  I married a biochemist and for decades we’ve shared lots of conversations about our work. When we first wrote about the “Neurochemistry of Positive Conversations” for Harvard Business Review and Psychology Today, we received confirmation that we were on to something important.

 

Positive comments and positive conversations provide a chemical “high,” and yet negative ones stick with us much longer. A critique from a boss, a disagreement with a colleague, or a fight with a friend can make you forget praise.  If you are called lazy, careless or unprofessional, you are likely to remember it and internalize it, making it not very easy to forget, and discounting all the times people say you’re talented.

 

Chemistry plays a big role in this reaction. When we face criticism, rejection or fear, when we feel marginalized or minimized, our bodies produce higher levels of cortisol, a hormone that shuts down the thinking center of our brains and activates conflict aversion and protection behaviors. We become more reactive and sensitive. We often perceive greater negativity than exists. These effects can last for days, imprinting the interaction on our memories and magnifying its impact on our future behavior. Cortisol functions like a sustained release tablet—the more we ruminate about fear, the longer the impact.

 

Positive comments and positive conversations also produce a chemical reaction. They spur the production of oxytocin—a feel-good hormone that elevates our ability to collaborate, communicate, and trust others by activating networks in our prefrontal cortex. But, since oxytocin metabolizes faster than cortisol, its effects are less dramatic and sustainable.

 

Chemistry of Conversations

This ‘chemistry of conversations’ is why we need to be more mindful of our interactions. Behaviors that increase cortisol levels reduce our conversational intelligence or C-IQ—our ability to connect and think innovatively, empathetically, creatively and strategically with others. Remember: behaviors that spark oxytocin boost C-IQ.

 

When we partnered with Qualtrics, the online survey software company, to analyze the frequency of negative (cortisol-producing) versus positive (oxytocin-producing) interactions, we found that managers appear to be using positive, oxytocin and C-IQ elevating behaviors more often than negative behaviors. Survey respondents said that they exhibited all five positive behaviors, such as ‘showing concern for others’ more frequently than all five negative ones, such as ‘pretending to be listening.’ However, about 85 percent of respondents also admitted to sometimes acting in ways that could derail not only specific interactions but also future relationships. And, when leaders exhibit both behaviors, they create dissonance or uncertainty in followers’ brains, spurring cortisol production and reducing C-IQ.

 

If you tend to tell and sell your ideas and challenge people to produce results, your negative (cortisol-producing) reactions could easily outweigh positive (oxytocin-producing) reactions. Instead of asking questions to stimulate discussion, showing concern for others and painting a compelling picture of shared success, you tend to enter discussions with a fixed opinion, determined to convince others you are right. You are not open to others’ influence—and you fail to listen to connect.

 

always_never-graph

 

This graph is from our Creating WE Institute Research into the Chemistry of Conversations. Red bars = cortisol producing, Green bars = oxytocin producing. The highest red bar is “focusing on convincing others.” Not only is it done more often, its impact is 26 times that of the oxytocin producing behaviors—suggesting that this one act alone can cause a relationship or sales engagement to go south.

 

Chemistry In Leadership

When managers and leaders learn about the chemical impacts of their behavior, they tend to make changes—for example, they learn to deliver difficult feedback in a way that is perceived as inclusive and supportive, thereby limiting cortisol production and stimulating oxytocin instead.

 

As we become mindful of the behaviors that open us up and those that close us down, and their influence in our relationships, we can better harness the chemistry of conversations. Mindfulness about our conversational impact enables us to get on the same page with others, strengthens our relationships – and expands our potential for higher levels of engagement and innovation. Without healthy conversations, we shrivel up and die. Conversations are the source of energy that moves us out of our doldrums when we are sad, the power that launches transformational products, and the golden threads that enable us to trust others. But these threads can be fragile and also unravel, causing us to run from others in fear of loss and pain. Conversations are the way we connect, engage, navigate, and transform the world with others.

 

“The quality of our culture depends on the quality of our relationships, which depends on the quality of our conversations. Everything happens through conversations.” The most powerful ‘leadershift’ we can make is to realize that each person has the power to create the conversational space that creates deeper understanding and engagement, not fear and avoidance.

 

Three Chemistry Lessons

Remember these three chemistry lessons:

 

1. Be mindful of your conversations and the emotional content you bring—either pain – which closes the brain, or pleasure which opens the brain. Are you sending friend or foe messages? Are you sending the message “You can trust me to have your best interest at heart” or “I want to persuade you to think about things my way?” When you’re aware of these meta-messages, you create a safe culture that allows all parties to interact collaboratively, sharing perspectives, feelings, and aspirations and elevating insights and wisdom.

 

2. Conversations trigger emotional reactions. Conversations carry meaning—and meaning is embedded in the listener even more than in the speaker. Words cause us either to bond and trust more fully, thinking of others as friends and colleagues, or to break rapport and think of others as enemies. Your mind will open as you see the connection between language and health, and you’ll learn how to create healthy organizations through your conversational rituals.

 

3. Note that the words we use in our conversations are rarely neutral. Words have histories informed by years of use. Each time a new experience overlays another meaning on a word, the information all gets collected in our brains to be activated during conversations. Knowing how you project meaning into your conversations will enable you to connect with others and, in so doing, let go of much of the self-talk that diverts you from working together effectively.

 


Judith E. Glaser is CEO of Benchmark Communications, Inc., Chairman of The Creating WE Institute, an Organizational Anthropologist, consultant to Fortune 500 Companies, and author of four best selling business books, including Conversational Intelligence: How Great Leaders Build Trust and Get Extraordinary Results (Bibliomotion).  Call 212-307-4386, visit www.conversationalingelligence.com; www.creatingwe.com; jeglaser@creatingwe.com

C-Suite TV Talks Moving Mountains, Thoughtful Leadership, Attack Bunnies, Millennials and Opening Doors

November 17, 2016 10:41 ET

Best Seller TV’s November Programming Features Authors Julie Miles Lewis, Mindy Gibbins-Klein, Randall Jones, Dan Negroni and Angela Preston

NEW YORK, NY–(Marketwired – Nov 17, 2016) – Best Seller TV, one of the top online business shows on C-Suite TV, has announced its November programming featuring in-depth interviews with leading business authors Julie Miles Lewis, author of Moving Mountains: Discovering the Mountain in You, Mindy Gibbins-Klein, author of The Thoughtful Leader: How to Use your Head and your Heart to Inspire Others, Randall Jones, author of Show Me: Celebrities, Business Tycoons, Rock Stars, Journalists, Humanitarians, Attack Bunnies, and More, Dan Negroni, author of Chasing Relevance: 6 Steps to Understand, Engage, and Maximize the Next Generation of Leaders in the Workplace and Angela Preston, author of Opening Doors.

 

Julie Miles Lewis, author of Moving Mountains: Discovering the Mountain in You, wants business leaders, or people transitioning from one career to the next, to change their perspective and find the ‘mountain within.’ By that she means seeing obstacles, not as obstacles, but as opportunities to “reach higher perspectives and a new outlook in life.” Lewis recognizes that for people in transition this can be a difficult task, but states that gaining a new perspective is “a great way to get moving when you feel stuck.” She defines resilience as “the ability to bounce back from any setback” and the best way to overcome obstacles is by applying three core concepts: meditation, coming to your senses, and affirmation.

 

Mindy Gibbins-Klein is the author of The Thoughtful Leader: How to Use your Head and your Heart to Inspire Others and says the book’s main message is that ‘thought leadership’ isn’t really ‘thoughtful’ unless the content being created is of value to readers. She defines thoughtful leadership as “the type of leadership that’s disruptive in content, stuff that makes heads turn.” Thoughtful leadership is something business leaders should aspire to, but also be aware that it requires coming up with ideas that will resonate with the market. Gibbins-Klein says her book is for anyone who wants to be a leader in their industry, or on their own, and that putting the time and effort up front will save you time later on.

 

Randall Jones’s book, Show Me: Celebrities, Business Tycoons, Rock Stars, Journalists, Humanitarians, Attack Bunnies, and More, is a collection of interviews and real-life stories from a wide variety of people — from famous musicians like Pat Benatar, to Erin Brockovich, to soap star, Kassie DePaiva. Jones, a columnist for the Naples Daily News, wanted to know what made people successful, how they became successful and if they had any tips that anyone, regardless of industry, could apply to their daily lives. He tells the story of how he was able to interview famous people by being patient and polite. He wanted the interviews to focus on the ‘lesser’ known stories of their daily lives. The most important lesson he learned compiling all these stories was “when you fall, just get up,” but you’ll have to read the book to know about the “attack bunnies.”

 

Dan Negroni, author of Chasing Relevance: 6 Steps to Understand, Engage, and Maximize the Next Generation of Leaders in the Workplace, wants to close the gap that currently exists between millennials and other generations, particularly in the workplace. He argues that the first step in closing the gap is by referring to millennials as the “next generation of leaders” and for each generation to rid themselves of preconceived notions of each other. Currently, millennials make up 40% of the workforce and in ten years, they’ll make up 75% of the workforce. In the end, Negroni says, millennials and older generations are looking for the same things: capability, authenticity, and feedback.

 

Angela Preston is the author of Opening Doors, a book about opportunity and the chance for a new beginning behind every door. Preston based the book on personal experiences growing up in Liverpool, in the U.K., and “never settling for circumstances.” She attributes her success in the financial industry, and now as a motivational speaker, to not having room for failure. To her, there’s no such thing as failure, it’s all about learning what not to do the next time. Preston also views success as becoming interested in people, understanding what makes them tick and using that interest as her main motivator. She advises professionals to always have a plan on how they will improve on something — a visible and tangible plan that keeps goals attainable.

 

All episodes of Best Seller TV will air throughout the month on C-Suite TV and are hosted by TV personality, Taryn Winter Brill.

 

“This month we have all these professionals from all walks of life. Every business leader that wants to be successful needs to be resilient, patient, a thoughtful leader, know when opportunity’s knocking and even get along with millennials,” Hayzlett said. “Leading up to the holidays and the end of the year, I think our audience will be inspired by what they hear and hopefully, they’ll feel empowered to become a better version of themselves and maybe start working on their resolutions a little early.”

 

For more information on TV episodes, visit www.csuitetv.com and for more information about the authors featured in Best Seller TV episodes, visit www.c-suitebookclub.com.

 


About C-Suite TV:
C-Suite TV, an entity of the C-Suite Network, is a web-based digital on-demand business channel featuring interviews and shows with business executives, thought leaders, authors and celebrities providing news and information for business leaders. C-Suite TV is your go-to resource to find out the inside track on trends and discussions taking place in businesses today. This online channel is home to such shows as C-Suite with Jeffrey Hayzlett, Executive Perspectives Live and Best Seller TV, and more. C-Suite TV is part of C-Suite Network, the world’s most powerful network of C-Suite leaders. Connect with C-Suite TV on Twitter and Facebook.

Executive Briefings: Organizing People Management with Theories & Tools

by Thomas White, CEO of C-Suite Network

 

I meet business leaders from all over the world who have advice, stories and personal tips for the business world. Periodically, I sit down with these leaders and give them the opportunity to provide current business advice and share personal stories as a business leader.

 

Dr. Brian Glibkowski is the founder and CEO of sixQ Software. He’s discovered a way that lets you assess what’s going on with the people in your workforce. They call it a next-generation assessment platform. Dr. Glibkowski brings more than 15 years in the areas of organizational behavior and human resource management, as a professor, author and consultant with large companies by helping them be more effective successful. He specializes in assessment, measurement and evaluation.

 

First we must ask, what are the six Qs? They are the six questions we all know: what, why, how, when, where, and who. We learned them in kindergarten. We don’t really know them often times in a systematic way. I conducted some research on these questions. They’re basically a way to think through your important business models to make sure you ask and answer all the questions.

 

Learn more about Dr. Glibkowski’s assessment on managing people HERE.

 

C-Suite Network Announces the Acquisition of the Hero Club

The most trusted network for business leaders bolsters its organization with the addition of Hero Partners’ highly regarded CEO community

NEW YORK, NY–(Marketwired – Nov 7, 2016) –  The C-Suite Network, the world’s most trusted network of C-Suite leaders, announced today the acquisition of Hero Partners’ Hero Club. The addition of the Hero Club, a private invite only club to educate and connect CEOs, furthers the mission of the C-Suite Network to support the advancement of business leaders within its community with resources and insights to achieve success and develop next-generation business strategies.

 

The C-Suite Network has been at the forefront of connecting and educating leaders in their community of esteemed executives. The agreement enables members of the Hero Club to have access to more business services, an extensive C-Suite Network of top level peers and conferences hosted by the C-Suite Network. As an organization highly regarded for empowering CEOs and entrepreneurs with the resources and experiences to build a company, the Hero Club joins C-Suite Network with influential leaders to share business insights and engage with executives within the rising community.

“The legacy of success the Hero Club has already experienced will be a catalyst for more growth and outreach to create an even bigger entrepreneurial community of CEOs,” said Jeffrey Hayzlett, chairman of C-Suite Network.

“The addition of the Hero Club enables us to expand our network worldwide with successful, heroic CEOs and entrepreneurs. The Hero Club embodies the C-Suite Network values with the importance of developing resources and establishing meaningful connections with the top C-Suite executives to invoke forward thinking dialogue and winning strategies for business success.”

 

The engagement rate has been rising within the C-Suite Network and Hero Club community as participation continues to thrive at well-respected conferences, summits and retreats hosted by each organization. The select CEOs and founders from companies with the brightest potential, which make up the Hero Club, will now have their experiences broadened with access to new events, an extensive executive and capital rich network as a result of the acquisition.

“Our priority is to our elite Hero Club CEO members and we see tremendous alignment in the culture and mission of C-Suite Networks and Hero Club. Hero Club’s exclusive access to private resort properties and prestigious events will add further value to the C-Suite offering. We look to a mutually beneficial partnership for both Hero Club and C-Suite Network member executives,” says Justin Hyde, co-founder and CEO of Hero Club.

“Having C-Suite Networks as a partner enables us to continue to educate members with insights to elevate their business to the next level and provide the ability to converse with premier C-Suite executives at a greater scale.”

 

Terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

For more information about the C-Suite Network, please visit www.c-suitenetwork.com.

 


About C-Suite Network
C-Suite Network is the world’s most powerful network of C-Suite leaders, with a focus on providing growth, development and networking opportunities for business executives with titles of vice president and above.

C-Suite Network brings leaders together through C-Suite Collective, a private online community for executives. C-Suite Network also offers invitation-only conferences held three times per year, custom-tailored content on the C-Suite Network blog, C-Suite TV, C-Suite Radio, C-Suite Book Club, and educational programs from C-Suite Academy. Learn more at www.c-suitenetwork.com, or connect on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

About Hero Club
The Hero Club strives to empower CEOs with the right resources, relationships, education, and experiences through our proven business models and strategy. The Hero Club knows this is the best way to influence and transform individuals, communities, and nations by promoting and supporting the spirit of entrepreneurism. Learn more at www.heroceoclub.com.

Stuck in Networking Hell? 3 Steps to Create Connecting Nirvana Instead

By: Joyce Layman

 

“Not another meeting…”

This has become the mantra for every corporate suit whose schedule is bursting with appointments, but networking is just as stressful. You spend your entire day meeting and greeting, exchanging business cards, and planning to email just about everyone in the cluster of states surrounding you. It’s looking like a busy week, and you’re ready to pull your hair out just thinking about it.

There are other things you could be doing instead of attending another boring event and meeting the same people again. Whatever the reason, you’d better hope there’s a Starbucks nearby so that you can load up on caffeine; you’re going to need it.

 

Why Do We Hate Networking?

 

A University of Toronto study by Professor Tiziana Casciaro found that working adults who participated felt “demoralized” when attending networking events due to the self-promoting and self-serving behaviors they had to show. However, senior partners that had been promoted to their positions due to high attendance at several networking events viewed the events in a much more positive light.

Just for the record, networking doesn’t always mean attending an event. There are other ways to forge relationships. It’s time to stop networking and focus more on connecting. By following these three steps, you can turn networking hell into connecting nirvana.

 

#1 – STOP TALKING BUSINESS!

 

Think back to the last event you enjoyed (hopefully there have been several!). It doesn’t have to be a networking event; it can be an outing with family and friends, a holiday party or sweatworking activity Whatever the event, you were relatively at ease and enjoyed the time you spent there.

Conversations you had at these events felt natural and pleasant because there was no pressure to make a sale or snag another client. When the pressure is off, we tend to let our conversations flow without the hesitation we normally feel at networking events. The trick is to stop thinking of it as a networking event and more of a chance to make a connection. It doesn’t have to be all business all the time. Meaningful connections start with a meaningful conversation.

 

#2 – GET OUT OF THE OFFICE

 

Your best connections can happen outside of a networking event. You don’t always have to hold meetings in an office or professional setting. Depending on who you are meeting with and what the goal of your meeting will be, you can adjust your settings to somewhere more comfortable. Obviously, if you’re going to be talking about something private, you’ll need a quiet space to discuss business.

I’m not saying you have to use the coffee shop for every meeting, but you should intentionally plan a meeting there once or twice a week. What’s even better is blocking your meetings so you can introduce the person you are meeting with to the one who is leaving. This could be a referral partner, potential client or someone you’re interested in exploring business opportunities with. If someone you know walks in, make an introduction.  Opportunities like this aren’t possible if you’re stuck in an office.

 

#3 – THINK SOCIAL

 

When it comes to networking, a lot of people tend to forget about social media. Social media is a great way to connections for both personal and professional use and was my ticket to making some of my most valuable connections and expanding my personal brand.

The key is using it strategically. It’s like one big game of “Six Degrees of Separation.” Social media gives you the opportunity to connect with potential referral partners and clients who are on the same platform you are. Depending on which platform you’re using, there are different ways to connect. If you’re on LinkedIn, you can send them a customized invitation to connect. Twitter may simply be a matter of following them and retweeting their content to get the conversation started.

If it’s Facebook, for example, who are the friends that you haven’t talked to in awhile or could be a beneficial connection in business? There’s no time like the present to reach out. Set a goal of reaching out to at least one person a week to reconnect. It’s amazing how taking a little time each week can expand your network.

 

Connecting Nirvana

Remember – networking doesn’t just mean attending an event and doesn’t have to be a mini version of hell either. Your connecting advantage can be achieved with a few simple, easy-to-follow steps. After all, it’s not rocket science.

• Stop talking business and just start talking!

• Get out of the office and find the right meeting place.

• Think social.

Why wait to start connecting? You can connect with me on Twitter @joycelayman, Facebook and LinkedIn. There’s always old-fashioned email too for questions and feedback.

 


About the Author

As a former wallflower in the world of business networking, Joyce’s passion is inspiring people to step out of their current habits and into the new opportunities and possibilities that are already surrounding them. Leveraging extensive training and experience in the science of mindset and the art of business connections, she provides the one-two punch that gives her clients an advantage over their counterparts and their competition.

As an in-demand national speaker, high-energy workshop developer, and facilitator, 2013 TEDxUMKC presenter, Joyce works with companies and influencers who have some of the pieces but haven’t been able to create a holistic strategy that leverages their expertise, capitalizes on their strengths, and unleashes the power of their network.

Where’s The Melody?

by Deborah Johnson

 

Wayland Pickard, a music colleague of mine, was famed pianist Roger William’s neighbor. William’s biggest hit was the song “Autumn Leaves,” the only piano instrumental to reach #1 on Billboard’s popular music chart. It sold over two million copies. At Roger’s front door was a large carved wooden Indian. The Indian’s right hand was at his forehead, shading his eyes from the sun, squinting to see some far-off object. When Williams asked what he thought the Indian was looking for, Wayland was at a loss. Roger said, “Where’s the melody?”

 

Even though that incident happened some years ago and Williams died in 2011, that phrase has stayed with me. “Where’s the melody?” applies not only to music, but to speaking, to writing, to leadership and to content in general. With the number of blogs, tweets, pings, videos and training programs, it is a question most leaders, speakers and writers should constantly ask themselves.

 

Regurgitated Melody

It becomes easy, especially after some years, to regurgitate the same material over and over again rather than work and craft a melody or message that is fresh, memorable and sticky. I was told by a client that a pianist played Elton John’s “Your Song” over and over again in the background for one of his events, thinking it didn’t matter much as no one was listening. Apparently it did matter, as that pianist wasn’t hired again.

 

I hear comics inserting every expletive imaginable and expounding on personal body parts to get quick laughs. Those comics using those shortcuts, sacrificing wit and craft, are by example, training a new generation to do the same. Where is the true humor? The story line? The content? As some speakers and authors take shortcuts, I have taken on the personal challenge to not take shortcuts where it really matters in my work. My goal is to help others get unstuck, giving them tools to move forward with realistic goals in life and business. If I have regurgitated content played over and over again, like a song stagnant and lost in background noise, my message will be watered down and weak.

 

How do you unearth significant content or create a memorable melody? There is no sure-fire way or formula. The main foundational ingredient is always hard work and discipline, enhanced with creativity and excellence.

 

Today, to find your niche or focus area, there are more coaches than clients touting their methods. A good coach is extremely valuable, and I encourage that assistance. However, there are basic initial commitments every leader, artist, author, comic or entertainer should make.

Commitment To Quality Melody, Message or Material

One of the most difficult challenges is to cut down content to be pithy and memorable. I have written full stage musicals where I have had to cut pages, songs and full sections to make the story move along quicker on a stage. It’s very difficult and I speak from experience that it takes many midnight hours of crafting. That same principle applies to speeches and books. What’s the heart of the message? Is it memorable? Is it applicable? Commit to quality content.

 

Commitment To Effective Communication

Communicating effectively takes creativity and work. Find ways to communicate that will inspire and keep your audience interested. Some are gifted with the ability to captivate an audience with only their personality, voice tone, style and presence. However, most would do well to use the visual and media tools available to communicate to an audience with ever diminishing attention spans.  Commit to excellent communication.

 

Commitment To Doing What It Takes

“It’s good enough,” is no longer good enough. There is too much competition! What will make you stand out to where you won’t be ignored any longer? Being great doesn’t just depend on great content, but going to the edge of your abilities and developing something that is unique; something that is yours alone. You may get away with being a copy-cat for awhile, but it doesn’t last. Commit to doing what it takes to be great.

 

If you commit to quality content, communication and doing what it takes to be great, you will have an answer for William’s question, “Where’s the melody?” Your content, your communication and your greatness will be your unique melody. The song is now within you, ready to be shared with the world!

 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Deborah Johnson helps others get unstuck, ridding bad mental code to reach realistic goals. Deborah is an award-winning entertainer with deft piano and vocal skills and uses those skills, when appropriate, in her speaking presentations. She has performed on many stages around the world as well as served as a first-call pianist for Disney for over twenty years. With a Masters Degree, she has taught every level through graduate school, receiving many awards for her innovative methods and abilities. Up for multiple Grammy Awards, Deborah is a prolific writer of musicals, songs and books. She is able to successfully help others reach their goals with proven principles gleaned from her expansive training and research.

C-Suite TV Talks Fearless Leadership and the Importance of Body Language

Best Seller TV’s September Programming Features Authors Carey Lohrenz and Greg Williams

NEW YORK, NY–(Marketwired – Sep 15, 2016) –  Best Seller TV, one of the top online business shows on C-Suite TV, has announced its September programming. This month’s programming features in-depth interviews with leading business authors Carey Lohrenz, author of Fearless Leadership: High Performance Lessons from the Flight Deck and Greg Williams, author of Body Language: Secrets to Win More Negotiations.

Carey Lohrenz, author of Fearless Leadership: High Performance Lessons from the Flight Deck, was one of the first women to fly fighter jets on and off aircraft carriers for the U.S. Navy. Her book was inspired by her experiences on the flight deck, working with a team full of high performers in volatile conditions where situations are ever-changing and how all of these factors helped to shape how people think about leadership and identify what worked and what didn’t.

Lohrenz talked about the “secret sauce” that defines fearless leadership and how it can be applied to Fortune 100 company executives. She talks about what fearless leadership looks like on an individual level and how executives can instill those same values on their teams. Lohrenz also adds that the biggest difference between those who are successful and those able to take it to the next level, is their ability to work through their fears.

She urges everyone to constantly push their limits — to do one thing every day that scares you because that’s how you grow.

Greg Williams, author of Body Language: Secrets to Win More Negotiations, talks about the importance of being able to read body language correctly and how people can understand what occurs when someone uses their body in certain ways through a number of situations, especially during the negotiation process. Williams’ tag line is, “We are always negotiating” and learning the nuances of a negotiation will help people gain insight on what the opposing negotiator’s body language might be saying.

Williams says there are several types of personalities: easy, difficult, hard, and open and people should conduct subtle tests to know which personality they will be negotiating with. He adds there are seven universal micro expressions that can help gain additional insight: fear, anger, disgust, surprise, contempt, sadness and happiness. Williams wants people to always remember, “That which you do today, influence tomorrow’s outcomes.”

All episodes of Best Seller TV will air throughout the month on C-Suite TV and are hosted by TV personality, Taryn Winter Brill.

“I’m excited about this month’s episodes as they delve into everyday situations that can be applied to any industry: leadership and reading body language,” Hayzlett said. “I was very impressed with Carey’s background as a fighter pilot and how that type of leadership can be applied to Fortune 100 companies as well as Greg’s ability to read into situations that can prove detrimental if perceived incorrectly. I think our viewers will gain valuable insight that’ll help them in future negotiations.”

For more information on TV episodes, visit www.csuitetv.com and for more information about the authors featured in Best Seller TV episodes, visit www.c-suitebookclub.com.


About C-Suite TV:
C-Suite TV is a web-based digital on-demand business channel featuring interviews and shows with business executives, thought leaders, authors and celebrities providing news and information for business leaders. C-Suite TV is your go-to resource to find out the inside track on trends and discussions taking place in businesses today. This online channel is home to such shows as C-Suite with Jeffrey Hayzlett, Executive Perspectives and Best Seller TV, and more. C-Suite TV is part of C-Suite Network, the world’s most powerful network of C-Suite leaders. Connect with C-Suite TV on Twitter and Facebook.

About Jeffrey Hayzlett:
Jeffrey Hayzlett is the primetime television host of C-Suite with Jeffrey Hayzlett and Executive Perspectives on C-Suite TV and is the host of the award-winning All Business with Jeffrey Hayzlett on the CBS on-demand podcast network, Play.It. Hayzlett is a global business celebrity, Hall of Fame speaker, best-selling author, and Chairman of C-Suite Network, home of the world’s most trusted network of C-Suite leaders. Connect with Hayzlett on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+ or www.hayzlett.com

2 Must-Have Qualities for Success – Hint: The Posture of a Baseball Player

By: Dave Fleming

 

Whether baseball is your thing or not, it’s worth watching a few innings of an MLB game this season. If you watch, pay attention to the stance of a player, just before a play occurs. This posture reveals two qualities we all need to increase our success no matter the endeavor.

SUCCESS QUALITY NO. 1

About the same time as the pitcher winds up to throw a pitch, the rest of the players assume a position I call relaxed vigilance. It’s easy to spot when you’re watching for it. Moments before the ball leaves the hand of the pitcher, players assume an open and flexible stance. This flexible stance readies them to move multiple directions based on where the ball is hit. In other words, their stance readies them for a number of possible scenarios. Simultaneously, players add vigilance to their stance. They are completely focused on the present moment. This focus directs attention at a very specific point in time and space. This allows them to see what is happening and quickly respond to it.

 

The key to this stance is the combination of relaxation and vigilance. That’s the ticket.

 

SUCCESS QUALITY NO. 2

If a player’s posture is vigilant but not relaxed, it leads to rigidity. This rigidity then diminishes his ability to quickly adapt his body to the emerging moment. A rigid stance doesn’t allow for needed flexibility. However, if a player’s stance is relaxed but not vigilant, it leads to unresponsiveness. This unresponsiveness then diminishes his participation in the moment. The play is over before he has any chance of entering it.

Many moments of our day require this same kind of relaxed vigilance. Without the simultaneous expression of these two qualities, we are rendered ineffective (or less effective) in the moment. It seems that most of us are better at one of the two qualities.

 

Some of us are superb at vigilance and others are excellent at relaxing in and through a moment. But, it’s the combination that increases success.

 

 


About the Author

Dave Fleming is a student and teacher of human ingenuity. Dave’s varied career, research and almost two decades of coaching groups around the world led him to develop a framework for collective innovation he calls Tribal Alchemy. Dave’s desire now is to get the word out about Tribal Alchemy. He wants to help groups turn what they have into what they need.

Dave earned a Doctor of Management in Organizational Leadership and a Ph.D. in Human and Organizational Systems. He is an assistant professor in the department of Psychiatry in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona. He speaks, writes, coaches and curates ideas on the process and practices of collective ingenuity.

Hero Club and Rocky Mountain Economic Summit Partner With C-Suite Network

NEW YORK, NY–(Marketwired – Sep 13, 2016) – The C-Suite Network, announced today at the C-Suite Network Conference in New York City a new partnership with the Hero CEO Club and the Rocky Mountain Economic Summit.

C-Suite Network, the world’s most trusted network of C-Suite leaders, gathers executives from across the country to network and share ideas at their C-Suite Conferences. Kicking off in November the Hero CEO Club and C-Suite Network will join forces to host a joint event in San Francisco in conjunction with the next C-Suite Network Conference. The events will connect attendees with industry experts, who share their wealth of experience and knowledge through keynote speeches, round table discussions, and interviews.

C-Suite Network also announced they will be a title sponsor at the Rocky Mountain Economic Summit in 2017.

 

“As the C-Suite Network grows we continue to look for partners that will help us deliver incomparable benefits to our members,” said CEO Thomas White. “These two events will give our executives a new perspective and better networking options,” he added.

 

Hero CEO Club strives to empower CEO’s with the right resources, relationships, education, and experiences through our proven business models and strategy. Hero CEO Club knows this is the best way to influence and transform individuals, communities, and nations by promoting and supporting the spirit of entrepreneurism.

 


About C-Suite Network
The C-Suite Network is the world’s most trusted network of C-Suite leaders, with a focus on providing growth, development and networking opportunities for business executives with titles of vice president and above.

C-Suite Network brings leaders together through C-Suite Collective, a private online community for executives. C-Suite Network also offers invitation-only conferences held three times per year, custom-tailored content on the C-Suite Network blog, C-Suite TV, C-Suite Radio, C-Suite Book Club, and educational programs from C-Suite Academy. Learn more at www.c-suitenetwork.com, or connect on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

Storms

By: Janna Hoiberg

 

When we were hiking the Colorado Trail one year, we hiked Mt. Oxford on day one. The morning was bright, with blue skies and warm temperatures. It was a perfect day for hiking a fourteener. We had camped part way up on the trail, hiked a bit farther, and dropped our packs in a cluster of trees. We marked the waypoint on the map (so we could find our stuff later in the day) and headed up the mountain.

The hike took us up and up, and as we got closer to the summit, we saw the storms rolling in. The clouds increased, the wind began to whip around us, and danger became real. The sight of a marker showing where someone had died on the mountain from a lightning strike brought the reality even closer to home. We started to make plans regarding how much farther we could push toward the top and still be safe.

Storms Reflect Realities

Doesn’t this reflect the realities in our business and careers?

Everything looks bright at the start. We have the new job, which includes a promotion and pay increase. We have hit the jackpot. We continue operating merrily along, basking in the sunshine of success.

Yet, there are storm clouds gathering in the distance that we haven’t recognized. We look to the distance and see only the striking blue of the sky contrasting with the beautiful, white, fluffy clouds. We are settling in and making progress—or so we think.

On a mountain, especially above tree line, it becomes fairly difficult to ignore a storm rolling in. There is little between you and those gathering clouds. Even if your head is down as you plod along, you still feel the change in temperature and the wind beginning to pick up. You still see the brightness beginning to dim. The scary thing is that above tree line, you are taller than most anything around you, and lightning likes tall objects.

pexels-photo-40081-storms

How do we prepare for the storm on the mountain and the storm in business?

First, pick your head up and look at the clouds. What types of clouds are out there, and which way are they moving? How much farther to the top of the mountain? How much farther till tree line, where you won’t be the tallest thing on the mountain? You don’t want to be tallest when lightning strikes! Preparing for a storm also means carrying with you the items you need to survive bad weather and possibly an overnight stay.

That hike I just mentioned was part of a four-day backpacking excursion. Day one was the climbing a fourteener. We started off cross country, found the trail, and kept on going. The weather was great, until we got close to the top. Then the clouds came rolling in. In less than one hour we went from cloudy to stormy, to rain, lightning, hail, snow, and heavy wind. Hail hurts and hurts a lot. We finished up to and started a very quick descent down. I wanted to be at tree line as soon as possible and off that mountain pronto.

You prepare for storms in your business and career in very much the same way as you do on a mountain. Pick your head up and start looking around, so you are aware of any gathering clouds. Listen to what that boss, your co-workers, and your clients are really saying. Don’t bury your head in the sand and assume that if you ignore bad stuff it will go away. It won’t. Ask questions, and understand the implications of the answers. Ask for feedback from both peers and management. And, as always, read, read, read! Improve yourself. Learn new ways of doing things. Get out of your comfort zone. I have a lot of discussions with executives and managers about how to get people out of their comfort zone so they don’t have to be let go.

 

Be open to new ways of doing things, and embrace change. If you don’t embrace change, you throw yourself into a potentially major storm.

 

Effects Of The Storm

People make mistakes; they say and do things that are not appropriate. As a result, storms are created. Unfortunately, storms in business don’t usually pass as quickly as storms on a mountain top. The effect of storms in business can last for days, weeks, months, or even years. They can affect revenue, productivity, and profit. On the other hand, at some point storms pass, and you must let them. Storms happen; people make mistakes. So have you. Get over it, and get past the fact that the mistake affected you. Even if it was intentional, move on. You see where I am going with this: the issue once again comes back to attitude. Inability to move past a storm at work essentially leaves you permanently at the top of a mountain with a storm swirling around you—just sitting there, asking for lightning to hit. You are the only one who can remove yourself from the storm. Once again, the choice is yours.

 


 

About the Author

Janna Hoiberg is a well-known author, international speaker, and award-winning executive and leadership business coach with over 30 years’ experience in managing and operating successful businesses. She has helped businesses increase profits, grow fiscally, improve systems, and strengthen teams and executive leadership.

As the author of several books and a wide range of business articles Janna has gained recognition throughout the US as a thought leader in the unique circumstances of businesses owned and managed by one or more family member. Her book — The Family Business:  How to be in Business with People you Love, Without Hating Them – is a critically acclaimed, insightful compendium of her learning throughout decades of running her own businesses, speaking and coaching work teams who just happen to be related to each other.

Her latest book:  The Backpackers Guide to Business Success:  Thriving in the Wilderness of Business has been a great hit.  “Success seldom just happens; it takes perseverance, preparation, planning and commitment. In the backwoods, lack of perseverance, preparation and planning can make the difference between life and death. One wrong step can literally mean death. Not being physically prepared can leave you stranded on the mountain and totally lost. The same concepts are true for our businesses and careers.”