2 Must-Have Qualities for Success – Hint: The Posture of a Baseball Player

By: Dave Fleming

 

Whether baseball is your thing or not, it’s worth watching a few innings of an MLB game this season. If you watch, pay attention to the stance of a player, just before a play occurs. This posture reveals two qualities we all need to increase our success no matter the endeavor.

SUCCESS QUALITY NO. 1

About the same time as the pitcher winds up to throw a pitch, the rest of the players assume a position I call relaxed vigilance. It’s easy to spot when you’re watching for it. Moments before the ball leaves the hand of the pitcher, players assume an open and flexible stance. This flexible stance readies them to move multiple directions based on where the ball is hit. In other words, their stance readies them for a number of possible scenarios. Simultaneously, players add vigilance to their stance. They are completely focused on the present moment. This focus directs attention at a very specific point in time and space. This allows them to see what is happening and quickly respond to it.

 

The key to this stance is the combination of relaxation and vigilance. That’s the ticket.

 

SUCCESS QUALITY NO. 2

If a player’s posture is vigilant but not relaxed, it leads to rigidity. This rigidity then diminishes his ability to quickly adapt his body to the emerging moment. A rigid stance doesn’t allow for needed flexibility. However, if a player’s stance is relaxed but not vigilant, it leads to unresponsiveness. This unresponsiveness then diminishes his participation in the moment. The play is over before he has any chance of entering it.

Many moments of our day require this same kind of relaxed vigilance. Without the simultaneous expression of these two qualities, we are rendered ineffective (or less effective) in the moment. It seems that most of us are better at one of the two qualities.

 

Some of us are superb at vigilance and others are excellent at relaxing in and through a moment. But, it’s the combination that increases success.

 

 


About the Author

Dave Fleming is a student and teacher of human ingenuity. Dave’s varied career, research and almost two decades of coaching groups around the world led him to develop a framework for collective innovation he calls Tribal Alchemy. Dave’s desire now is to get the word out about Tribal Alchemy. He wants to help groups turn what they have into what they need.

Dave earned a Doctor of Management in Organizational Leadership and a Ph.D. in Human and Organizational Systems. He is an assistant professor in the department of Psychiatry in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona. He speaks, writes, coaches and curates ideas on the process and practices of collective ingenuity.

Let’s talk about Change, Baby!

By: Ilja Grzeskowitz

 

Some time ago, I read an interview from former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, where he made a fascinating observation. He said:

“Today, mankind produces more information, data and ideas than from the stone age until the year 2003 together.“

And he nailed it with that statement. Because the changes around us are getting more and more intense. Everything changes. Permanently. The economy, the organizational structures in our companies, our very own working space. As a keynote speaker and change agent, I have the privilege of working with lots of great organizations. And it doesn’t matter, at which industry I look, whether it’s a big brand like BWM or Lufthansa, or a small company with just a hundred employees. There is one thing they all have in common: The rules have definitely changed.

 

Change is the New Normal

Especially the globalization, the demographic trend and the digital revolution are the main reasons that markets change dramatically. And, the customers are behaving completely different than they used to do just a few years ago. That means that our ability to deal with this new complexity will be the most important factor if we will still be successful in the future or if we become obsolete. And just to be clear, I’m not talking about change for changes sake, but about change with a purpose, with intention. Change to reach your goals, to become more profitable and to get the results you want. In the near future, nothing will be more important, than to adapt to these new circumstances. Because constant change has long become the new normal.

 

Go First and Lead the Changes in Your Organization

What does all that mean to your jobs as leaders? First, you need to quickly adapt to all of the changes going on around you and adjust your own mindset. Even more importantly, you need to lead the changes in your industry, your company and your teams. Companies only change, when the people change. And it is your job to make sure they do. Not by telling them or giving orders, but by reaching their hearts and leading with your actions. And believe me, I know what I am talking about. In my own career, I started out as the youngest store manager in Germany’s largest department store corporation and overall, I was responsible for ten different stores all over the country. During that period, not only did I have to deal with tough competition, changing markets and the upcoming phenomena of online shopping, but also with a huge crisis within the company itself. Locations were shut down, profits were decreasing and thousands of employees were facing the fear of unemployment.

 

During these tough times, I learned the biggest lesson of my life:

Change is not what happens around you, but the way how you deal with it. It is your mindset. Your attitude.

And after all, the culture in your organization. Let me share one of my deepest beliefs with you: A company culture of innovation, flexibility and courage beats every sophisticated business strategy by far. Because there´s one thing, you can be sure of: If you are good, your competition will copy everything. They will copy your products, your prices, maybe even your marketing. But they will never be able to copy your culture.

 

 

Create a Culture of Change in Your Company

In my new book “Think it. Do it. Change it.”, you will learn how to develop this special attitude of change. I will show you how motivation really works, why the fear of going new ways is actually your best friend, and how to use your own uniqueness to lead the changes in your company, your community and most importantly, in your family.

 

At the end of the day, dealing with change is mindset. A certain way of thinking, deciding and taking action, that we have to adjust not only once, but on a daily basis. The more you use that special attitude, the sooner you will develop strong habits. And that’s important, because changes never happen overnight. They are a process with successes and failures. With ups and downs. You have to work hard to make it happen every single day. Isn’t it true? It’s never the one with the best abilities who wins, but always the one who is well prepared, takes massive action and changes actively. Because under the same circumstances it’s always the attitude, the mindset, the company culture that makes all the difference in the world. So dream big. Act bold. And you will get the results you want.

 

 

 

About the Author

Ilja Grzeskowitz (spoken Graesch –ko –witz) is an award winning keynote speaker who has inspired audiences in eight different countries on three continents. He has a University degree in economics and marketing and was a successful manager in retail, before he founded his own company in 2009. As a bestselling author of seven books, he works with organizations and companies on creating a culture of change. Among his clients are BMW, Lufthansa or Deutsche Telekom. The media called him, “Germany’s No.1. change expert.” Grzeskowitz is a father of two and lives in Berlin, Germany. Visit him online: www.grzeskowitz.com

 

Leadership – A Sacred Relationship?

By: Lance Secretan

 

After spending a lifetime as both a leadership practitioner and an advisor and coach to leaders I have learned that approaching the subject of leadership in our traditional ways may have contributed more to our current crisis of leadership than to any leadership successes.

 

THE STATE OF QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT

Classical physics invites us to measure matter and energy in a manner familiar through observable human experience, analyzing the separate parts, and this is largely the way we explain science and technology today (see my book “ONE”). We measure and teach leadership in a similar way, using these classical approaches. Without getting into too much technical detail here, we have learned that these concepts do not adequately describe the universe, and that, in reality, the newer science of quantum physics informs us that there are no separate entities—everything is connected. Indeed, the concept of “quantum entanglement” describes the phenomena in which the act of measuring one thing determines the possible quantum state of another.

 

THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD

The outdated approach of classical physics, and therefore “the scientific method”, is what we have been using to study leadership—as a subject consisting of separate parts—leaders, followers, organizations, contexts, goals and more (see my White Paper on why this has failed us and what is next). We have even succumbed to the false belief that behavior displayed and exhibited within an organization is separate from, and sometimes not even appropriate for, life outside the organization—for example, at home. But this is an illusion—everything is connected and everything is one, which is evident in my work every day coaching leaders who are seeking to rebuild their domestic partnerships AND reach their professional goals.

 

SACRED ENERGY

The sacred energy we invest in our marriages and personal relationships, is, in reality, exactly the same energy we need to invest in our work life and our organizations. My own list (everyone will have their own take on this) of practices and behaviors needed for a successful marriage are: personal growth and mutual learning, being fully present, curiosity, freshness, spiritual passion, maintaining individuality AND (paradoxically) oneness, vulnerability, intimacy, humility, empathy, devotion, love, rituals, transparency, trust, reliability

These, when practiced with sacred energy, lead to sacred and inspiring relationships. Since everything is connected, and one—it stands to reason that these necessary conditions for an inspiring relationship will lead to inspiring relationships anywhere—at work, with nature, with each other—even with God. Clinging to the illusion of separateness gets in the way of our potential. To raise our game we need to create inspiring relationships—everywhere.

About the Author

Dr. Lance Secretan is one of the most insightful and provocative leadership teachers of our time. He is the former CEO of a Fortune 100 company, university professor, award-winning columnist, poet and author of 15 books about inspiration and leadership and a recent memoir (A Love Story). He coaches and advises leaders globally (he is ranked 26th most influential executive coach globally), and guides leadership teams who wish to transform their culture into the most inspirational in their industries.

Executive Briefings: Serving on a Corporate Board – Where to Start

By: Thomas White, CEO of C-Suite Network

 WIB - header

I recently sat down with Sheila Ronning, CEO and Founder of Women in the Boardroom. In 2002, long before women on boards was a hot topic, Sheila believed in women’s ability to serve on corporate boards. She believed strongly enough to found Women in the Boardroom. Today, Sheila excels at connecting women executives and professionals with the people and tools they need to succeed in business and the boardroom.  As one of the nation’s top leadership and board service experts, she has built a strong track record and powerful network, which she uses to help women achieve their goals.

You can read more here: http://bit.ly/CorpBoard

 


The C-Suite is a vast audience of leaders who all have a little extra insight into their industry and the current business world. I sit down with these leaders to give them the opportunity to share that insight and give a glimpse to their personal stories as a business leader.

Why Do Managers Lead with Fear?

By: Peter Stark

 

I am currently working with a manager who told his team, “If this campaign isn’t perfect when we launch, some of you will be looking for a new job.” Yikes. That’s almost as inspiring as telling your team, “Terminations will continue until morale improves.” Although the manager didn’t share his threat with us, several of his employees did.

The Big Question Is…

Why would a manager feel the need to manage with fear? It’s tough to get a manager relying on fear to self-examine and admit this, but in most cases this strategy results from the manager projecting their own lack of confidence and fear. When these managers lack confidence and are fearful of potentially failing, they may not even realize that they are projecting their own fear onto others.

When team members operate in fear and focus solely on survival, they no longer have their primary focus set on executing the mission and making decisions that are in the best interest of the organization. Even worse, great employees seldom stick around a fearsome leader. Employees who produce stellar results earn reputations that put them in high demand by other manager and organization, and they won’t hesitate to leave for an organization with a healthier culture.

 

In addition to his threatening words, this manager exhibited several other characteristics that helped solidify the culture of fear he had created.

Blamed others, but claimed the credit. When things went wrong, this manager was quick to blame his own team members or team members in other departments. When things went well, however, he would immediately point out all the things he had done to make the outcome successful.

Trash talked. This manager had a habit of talking poorly about almost everyone in the organization. This left anyone who ever interacted with him wondering, “What does he say about me behind my back?”

Used threats. When this manager told his team they might be looking for new jobs if their next campaign was not successful, this manager conveyed to team members that they were not qualified for their jobs. By using threats, he also made it clear that mistakes were not acceptable.

Withheld praise. For whatever reason, this manager did not acknowledge the excellent work often done by his team members.

Withheld information. This manager chose to communicate with employees strictly on a “need to know” basis. Very few team members had all the pieces of the puzzle, which made it difficult for them to make decisions. With a lack of honest, direct and timely communication, everyone wants to play it safe for fear of making a bad decision.

Didn’t delegate. Because he didn’t trust his team to get the job done the way he would do it, he spent his time on day-to-day operational tasks instead of working on strategic projects that would have the greatest impact on the team and organization.

Can a manager known for leading with fear change their negative reputation? The good news is that with a significant change in their leadership style, yes, they can. The bad news is that is takes consistent repetition of positive leadership behaviors over a long period of time to earn a more positive reputation.

 

 

7 ACTIONS TO BUILD A POSITIVE REP

The following 7 actions were ones I recommended to help this leader build a positive reputation and take his leadership skills to a higher level.

 

KNOW YOURSELF

Collect feedback to better understand your strengths as a leader and where you have opportunities for development. This will help you craft a leadership style that will maximize the number of people who are highly engaged and love coming to work to help you and your team succeed.

COMMUNICATE A CLEAR VISION AND GOALS

Most people want to work for a manager with a positive vision of their organization’s future. Employees want to know what goals will turn that vision into a reality, and what they are contributing to the realization of the vision.

TAKE ACTION

Goals are all about “I think we can.” When you take action and accomplish your goals, you develop confidence because you feel you are in control and have mastery over your organizational life.

ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY

When things go wrong, great leaders are quick to take responsibility for ensuring that the problem is fixed and doesn’t happen a second time. Great leaders may not say they are personally to blame for the problem, but they are quick to say, “I take full responsibility for ensuring this doesn’t happen again.”

GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE

Almost everyone has a high need to be valued and appreciated for their contributions. Great leaders know that providing people with recognition for their successful contributions is a significant part of building strong relationships with employees.

ENCOURAGE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Hold quarterly meetings with each of your direct reports to review their goals and to determine what they are working on to help them grow and develop. This will most likely mean that you are encouraging your team members to be willing to take a risk. Encouraging risk is also encouraging people to be comfortable with the sometimes-scary possibility of failure. Taking a risk, however, is the polar opposite of paralysis by fear.

DELEGATE

Trusting others and being able to appropriately delegate is the key to your next promotion. Communicate the desired result, and then put the appropriate safeguards in place to follow up and ensure its success.

 

Managers who lead with a strategy of fear may be feared, but they will never be respected. When a manager utilizes fear as their strategy, I can guarantee one thing will happen: team members will eventually band together to undermine their manager. In the military and law enforcement, we call this getting hit by friendly fire. These seven tips, when put into action and consistently practice over long period of time, will help you be the leader who instead earns a strong reputation for building a culture of trust and the ability to produce significant results.

 

 

 

About the Author

Peter B. Stark, CSP, AS, is the President of Peter Barron Stark Companies. He and his team partner with clients to build organizations where employees love to come to work. Peter and his team are experts in employee engagement surveys, leadership and employee development, team building, and executive coaching.

Would You Hire You? 10 Ways to Add Value to Your Position

By: Doug Sandler

Ask yourself this question and have the courage to give an honest answer: Would you hire you? If words like passionate, excited, motivated and inspired describe you, you probably will get the gig. If, however, you are struggling to find the right words that fit or more importantly, if you are saying to yourself, “I would be positive, passionate, motivated and inspired by my work, but…(fill in the blank),” chances are good you wouldn’t get a call back or a second interview for the position. Excuses will not help boost your value, only action will.

Here are 10 questions that will help determine your value at work:

CONTRIBUTION
Do you contribute to a positive office culture or does your attitude at work fan the flame of average? The overall profitability of the company you work for is attributed to the culture created within that organization. Companies like Zappos, Wegmans, Apple, Nordstrom and dozens more are household words because of the amazing culture created by the people that work there. You have within you the ability to be better than average. Make sure you prove it to yourself and add to your value.

EFFORTS
Do your efforts take the customer experience to the next level up or does the effort elevator not quite make it to your floor? If you haven’t already realized it, your effort is felt by everyone around you, not just your company’s customers. Everyone you come in contact with is your customer and they all need you to be positive. Your value at work is directly related to the contributions you make to your company.

PROBLEM SOLVER
Can you add problem solver to your resume or do you prefer to hand issues to someone else in your office? You don’t need to be an investigator like Sherlock Holmes or as smart as Einstein, but contributing to problem resolution or supporting someone trying to solve a problem will add value to your role. It’s valuable to be a part of the solution. Under no circumstances do you want to be a part of the problem.

GOING THE EXTRA MILE
Do you go the extra mile for your company or do you take shortcuts as you find them? Creating system improvements and working to provide exemplary service are qualified as going the extra mile. However, creating a shortcut that potentially can lead to less than stellar performance grades will diminish your value. Change for the sake of change will not add to your value.

ARE YOU AN INFLUENCER?
Would you describe yourself as an influencer or someone that is influenced? You do not need to be assigned to a management position in order to be considered an influencer. If you are well respected in the workplace, you are boosting your value.

PROCESS IMPROVEMENTS
Does the idea of creating a new and improved system inspire you to look for ways to streamline your work process or would you prefer leaving systems in place? Making simple systems improvements or providing suggestions to make a process easier proves you are not just doing your job but actually thinking about the bigger picture. Creative thinking improves your value.

ARE YOU A GOOD LISTENER?
Are you a good listener or are you at the office water cooler adding to the rumor mill? A good listener knows that he doesn’t know everything but wants to learn from someone more wise and with more experience on the job. Seek out a mentor where you work. Knowledge is power and will contribute to your value. Water cooler conversation and gossip contributes to negative office politics and should be avoided.

TEAMWORK
When a team is needed to accomplish a task would you describe yourself as a volunteer or a captive participant? Teamwork, partnerships and cooperative effort involves building relationships. Great relationships equal better business. Whether you own your own business or work for a large organization, you should look for opportunities to work on a team. Teamwork sparks creative thinking. If you find yourself in a position to accomplish a task as a part of a team, don’t shy away from role.

UNSCHEDULED MOMENTS
Do projects, customers, vendors, phone calls and emails slow you down from doing your job or are they a part of your job? Do not live in a vacuum at work. Remember that communication is a part of your job. In order for your company to exist, these relationships are essential. Each opportunity to communicate with your customers and vendors/suppliers is a chance to strengthen your brand. Lean into these unscheduled moments to gain trust and add value to your position and your company.

INCREASE YOUR VALUE
Do you have a bright light passion for what you are building or do you see passion as something only dreamers dream about? Increase your value by being more kind than you need to be, friendlier than others expect you to be and put your heart out there for others to see even more than you already do now.

Embrace the role you play at work and don’t just go through the motions. Honestly, anyone can be average. Average offers no value. Being average is not a stepping stone to anything other than mediocrity. Being average will never amount to happiness, it will only amount to getting by. Have the strength to set your sights on your bigger goals and be passionate about the contribution you make at work. Passion adds value. Have the courage to dream bigger and to be passionate about the responsibilities you have at work.

About the Author

Doug Sandler has over 30 years of business experience as an entrepreneur and leader. His book, Nice Guys Finish First is a #1 ranked Amazon Best Seller.  As a podcaster, Doug has interviewed Arianna Huffington from HuffPost, Dan Harris from Good Morning America, Ron Klain, White House Chief of Staff and dozens of celebs. He specializes in teaching others the “how-to’s” of building relationships and strengthening connections. Doug is a nationally recognized speaker and writer.  His weekly posts reach hundreds of thousands of readers. Doug has been titled by a leading social media marketing company in the top 100 of Social Media Thought Influencers to follow.

What is the Name of My Game?

By: Daniel T. Bloom

Every day our organizational management is confronted with the rush to Big Data and its impacts on organizational metrics. However, this rush is failing to understand one critical factor in making a decision.

 

THE SCENARIO

Consider this:  It is a dreary, overcast day and so you decide to go to the mall to do some shopping. As you enter your favorite big box store, you see an 18-year-old, blonde, blue-eyed girl head directly to a particular display. I am not trying to create a stereotype but rather to demonstrate the basis of big data.

Marketing has spent large sums of money to create an experience based on big data to create a vision of the ‘why that 18-year-old would head to that particular display.’ Their models extensively study the correlation behind the demographics and desires of certain population groups and how they result in purchases by these groups.

 

IMPLIED BIG DATA

In the readings on the implications of big data in HR, one article suggested the use of a tool called predictive analysis. The example they provided was that big data told an organization that every time a certain manager interviewed a candidate for an open position, the hire resulted in a failed hire. The extended logic was that if this hiring manager was the next manager up for an opening, the odds were that the hire would not last. Correlation is great for certain aspects of the organization, but HR needs to look at the causality of the human capital management issues are clearly understood.

Return to our predictive analysis example we discussed above. It is critical that when we have a problem with a process, it is almost never a people problem. If this is correct, then the fact that a particular manager is interviewing failed hires is not the grounds for a valid correlation. Rather, it’s a sign that something is wrong with the process. Is the reason that the hires fail due to the wrong cultural fit? Is the reason the hires fail due to the wrong skills for the position? The use of the continual process improvement methodology provides you with the tools to discover the root causes of the process problems that a concentration on correlations does not and cannot.

 

CORRECTING THE OBSTACLES

When we determine that in order to correct the obstacles to the hiring process, we need to find a driven method to empower change in our organizations. Cause and effect determination is method to drive that change. The TLS Continuum (Theory of Constraints- Lean- Six Sigma) provides a roadmap to discover the causes of the process problems.

We are not suggesting that Big Data does not have a place within our organizations. It certainly does in areas like sales or marketing. But when the success of our organizations is dependent on knowing why we are experiencing process errors there is a better route to go with the TLS Continuum and the Continuous Process Improvement tools.

The TLS Continuum combines the tools of critical thinking with those evidence-based tools of Lean and Six Sigma to produce a congruent system which identifies the obstacles (TOC) and then removes the obstacle (Lean) and then concludes with the application of six sigma to create the standard of work and remove variations.

 

About the Author

Daniel T. Bloom SPHR, SSBB, SCRP is a well-respected author, speaker and human resource strategist, who during his career has worked within a wide variety of industries. He has been an educator, a contingency executive recruiter, a member of a Fortune 1000 divisional HR staff and the Corporate Relocation Director for several real estate firms in the Tampa Bay area. He is an active member of the HR social media scene since 2006 with contributions to Best Thinking.com, WordPress, Human Capital League, and Recruiting Blogs.

He has also published three books—Just Get me There in 2005 which is documented history of the Corporate Relocation Industry, Achieving HR Excellence through Six Sigma published in 2013 and the Field Guide to Achieving HR Excellence through Six Sigma in 2016. He has also written over 40 articles which have appeared both in print and online on various HR issues.

C-Suite TV Talks Enacting Change, Empowerment, Sales Coaching, Customer Service and the Importance of ‘WE’ Commerce

 

April/May Programming for Best Seller TV Features Authors Ilja Grzeskowitz, Meridith Elliott Powell, Jason Forrest, Donna Cutting, and Billee Howard

NEW YORK, NY–(Marketwired – May 11, 2016) – Best Seller TV, one of the top online business shows on C-Suite TV, has announced their upcoming episodes for April and May. Best Seller TV will feature in-depth interviews with a number of leading business authors: Ilja Grzeskowitz, author of Think It. Do It. Change It.: How to Dream Big, Act Bold and Get the Results You Want, Meridith Elliott Powell, author of Own It: Redefining Responsibility – Stories of Power, Freedom & Purpose, Jason Forrest, author of Leadership Sales Coaching: Transforming from Manager to Coach, Donna Cutting, author of 501 Ways to Roll Out the Red Carpet For Your Customer: Easy to Implement Ideas to Inspire Loyalty, Get New Customers and Make Lasting Impressions and Billie Howard, author of WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate and Succeed in the Sharing Economy.

Ilja Grzeskowitz, or “change expert #1” as he’s known by German media, talks about his new book, Think It. Do It. Change It.: How to Dream Big, Act Bold and Get the Results You Want, which details the step-by-step process he uses with clients to make change happen. Grzeskowitz says in order to make change happen, one must not just think differently, but act differently, too. He also highlights the six steps to fully execute the change you want — dream, vision, direction, goal, action plan and execution. A firm believer in ‘firing’ the negative people in your life and allowing the fear of change to become your best friend, Grzeskowitz feels dealing with change will be the most important skill everyone will need to master in the upcoming years. He urges his readers to remember the following when thinking of change, “You will become the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” Become an agent of change.

In her book, Own It: Redefining Responsibility – Stories of Power, Freedom & Purpose, Meridith Elliott Powell talks about the need for both leaders and employees to take responsibility — not only in their work life, but in their personal life as well. She decided to write the book after discovering how powerful and empowering taking ownership of your own life and career can be. Powell feels that, “If people could learn how to take responsibility and the skill of it, they can do or accomplish anything they wanted” and when both leaders and employees take responsibility, she states, you have “a serious recipe for success.”

Jason Forrest, author of Leadership Sales Coaching: Transforming from Manager to Coach, compares sales professionals to athletes in the sense that they want to be coached like an athlete, rather than managed like an employee. He also highlights the difference of being a manager and a coach, stating that a manager makes peoples’ lives easier, while coaches make people better. Forrest is also a big believer in unleashing profits through people. The book is field-tested to reduce turnovers and increase sales, and it’s aimed at “corporate gladiators” interested in becoming coaches rather than managers.

Donna Cutting’s book, 501 Ways to Roll Out the Red Carpet For Your Customer: Easy to Implement Ideas to Inspire Loyalty, Get New Customers and Make Lasting Impressions, tackles the world of customer service and rolling out the red carpet for all customers. Cutting states that employees need to be armed with all the proper tools in order to provide excellent customer service. When employees don’t have all the tools, there’s a disconnect with the service they ought to provide, but don’t. She says there are four main things to think about:

1. Consistency – Every customer receiving the same level of service from every team member at every opportunity, every single time
2. Technical piece – Involves asking the question, ‘Am I delivering the product or service I’m promising?’
3. How do you deliver – How are employees delivering customer service? Are they making the customer feel like they’re important?
4. ‘Wow’ factor – The unexpected moment of surprise and delight that makes people want to talk about you in a positive way

Billee Howard’s book, WE-Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate and Succeed in the Sharing Economy, highlights a world in which culture and commerce collide in ways that are considered unprecedented and an economy driven by entrepreneurialism and creativity. Howard talks about how the sharing economy ushered a variety of micro-economies that enable people to come together and experience luxuries they’ve never experienced before. She makes the argument that millennials, and Gen Z behind them, aren’t interested in owning possessions, but in sharing, borrowing, and using technology to come together and help make the world a better place.

All episodes of Best Seller TV will air throughout the month on C-Suite TV and are hosted by TV personality Taryn Winter Brill.

Best-selling author, speaker, and former Fortune 100 CMO Jeffrey Hayzlett created C-Suite TV to give top-tier business authors a forum for sharing thought-provoking insights, in-depth business analysis, and their compelling personal narratives.

“We have a great lineup for April and May! I am a big believer in empowering those around me so I think our viewers will enjoy these interviews that talk about making necessary changes and the empowerment that comes with enacting a positive change — personally and professionally,” Hayzlett said.

For more information on TV episodes, visit www.csuitetv.com and for more information about the authors featured in Best Seller TV episodes, visit www.c-suitebookclub.com.

Selecting the right depositary bank and collateral agent/trustee for your infrastructure project

Project financing has changed over the years to include a more multi-faceted structure. In the past the purpose of the financing may have been to simply build a facility however, today, it is not uncommon for a single project to be divided into multiple phases or be composed of multiple facilities in order to meet the long range goals of the project. The financing for this type of structure may include multiple loan types with different parameters, include additional time frames for equity contributions or other types of cash infusions or include conditional lenders such as a swap counterparty or a letter of credit provider. This level of complexity requires that your chosen Depositary Bank and Collateral Agent understand how these phases affect the cash flow and assignment of collateral to the Secured Parties.

MAKING YOUR CHOICE

When it comes to choosing a Depositary Bank and Collateral Agent that will successfully administer your project finance transaction, look for institutions that understand the structure of your deal and its corresponding responsibilities based on the project agreement and any ancillary agreements to which they are signatories.

There are many challenges to any large project/transaction—knowing what to look for, and hiring the Depositary Bank and Collateral Agent that are right for your project can be instrumental to its success.

Click here to learn more

Are you ready for the 21st Century Enterprise?

By Matt Preschern, CMO – HCL Technologies

Think of a national bank. Can you name its main competitors? If you simply listed rival banks, think harder. It has to fend off threats from Paypal, Square, SoFi and several lean start-ups that could jeopardize its business model with a cool, user-friendly app. And that’s not all. Threat looms from Apple, Amazon and Google, who are changing customer expectations dramatically with their digital and mobile payment services. Similar seismic shifts are playing out in virtually every business, from car manufacturers to airlines to healthcare companies. New digital rivals, epitomized by Uber and Airbnb, are derailing revenue and cost structures across industries. Not every industry is equally impacted by this disruption, but everyone is seriously concerned. Talk to any business leader across the world, and you will see these disruptive digital lean start-ups are a hot button issue. And they sparked some of the most invigorating discussions, while I was at the C-Suite Network Conference in Boston earlier this week. 

Millennials in the driving seat

Let’s step back a little and try to understand the forces shaping this massive wave of disruption. Millennials, the first generation of digital and social natives, are at the forefront of the action. Probably influenced by their always-on, multi-tasking, multi-device lifestyles, the digital-savvy cohort wants instant and personalized experiences. And they don’t shy away from sharing their brand preferences via digital and social channels. This generation is expected to spend $200 billion annually by next year and a whopping $10 trillion in their lifetime. That could motivate several companies to completely change how they interact, engage and address queries from customers.

Disrupt or get disrupted

This is a huge shift. How should you respond, if you are facing this volatility? Here is the mantra: Disrupt yourself and transform into a 21st Century Enterprise (21 CE) or get disrupted. Embracing digital, mobile, cloud and analytics is part of the picture, but there is more. To remodel into a 21 CE, your company needs to transition to a customer-centric and outcome-based model and adopt an agile and lean structure to continually adapt to a dynamic market. These multi-pronged transformations are not easy for large well-established companies with thousands of employees and assets worth billions of dollars. They need to completely overhaul their customer experience, operational processes and business models. Take outcome-based model, for instance. Companies that sell products will instead offer subscription-based services around their products. Their revenue won’t depend on the number of units shipped but on delivering solutions that directly produce quantifiable results. In the new business landscape, the transaction doesn’t end at the checkout or after a social media review of their experience.

Uber-proof your company

In an era where the relationship with your customers, employees and ecosystem is continually evolving, it’s important to lay focus on ‘how’ to make yourself uber-proof. Let’s take some time to look at few important changes one needs to embrace in adopting the 21 CE company culture and model:

 1.       Balance new power structures: Digitalization and other tech initiatives need a lean and agile structure that could break down silos and short-circuit lengthy corporate processes. This could rejig several departments and power structures.  

2.       Focus on experience: It’s not enough to give customers the product they want and when they want. Brands need a strong emotional connect that sets them apart in customer’s minds and hearts.

3.       Be consistent across touch points: A 21 CE organization needs to go beyond digital and provide their customers the same, consistent experience across channels, from web to social media to physical stores.

 4.       Personalize Interactions: It’s crucial to deliver the right message to the right person at the right time. This requires advanced digital marketing tools and predictive analytics models that collect information, extract meaningful insights and then convert them into real-time and tangible business actions and outcomes in line with shifting market trends.

 5.       Reorient and Reskill: To survive and thrive in this environment, everyone in the team must ‘up their game”. This new age environment demands us to reskill for all key characteristics of 21 Century Enterprise across aspects of  economics, human experience, design, unified ecosystem and the 21st century buyer journey.

So, it’s a tough re-alignment. But make no mistake. It’s not optional. Since 2000, 52% of the Fortune 500 companies have merged, been acquired, gone bankrupt, or fallen off the list as competition intensified and business models got disrupted, according to Constellation Research.  So, don’t be afraid to break things in order to make them better. There’s no other way to keep pace with today’s fast-changing world.