What is the True Entrepreneur’s ‘Difference’? To Find Out, Ask Yourself These 3 Questions.

A large number of C-Suite leaders consider job loss their No. 1 business concern. Entrepreneurism is the key to sustainable success, as is a culture that supports risk taking. C-Suite Network Co-Founder and CEO Thomas White explores three key factors that separate entrepreneurs from executives in his latest article for Enterpreneur.com. 

My former business partner, Sheldon Adelson, is the epitome of the American success story. The son of a Boston cab driver, he early on decided that his best option was to skip college and instead hone his skills by starting a business. Along the way, he never stopped learning and dreaming — and pushing against conventional wisdom. Perhaps that’s why Adelson succeeded as one of the most successful entrepreneurs of our time.

Another push Adelson made against conventional wisdom is implicit in his view that while the CEO of this or that company is no doubt very successful, he or she is not an entrepreneur. I didn’t agree with this early on, but as I spend more time with senior executives of companies, I get Adelson’s point: There are many great qualities of successful entrepreneurs, and one of them is that these entrepreneurs aren’t worried about losing their job.

More than anything else, this concern separates entrepreneurs from executives.

I have studied surveys of c-suite leaders from companies of all sizes. Consistently, throughout these surveys, you’ll find that one of the top three concerns of top business leaders is the fear of losing their jobs. What is the impact of this concern, and if you are truly committed to being an entrepreneur, what can you learn?

Worry about job loss always, always affects the ability to both be true to your dream and to act with fearlessness. The most successful entrepreneurs are clear about their vision, and persuasive in inspiring others to adopt it. These entrepreneurs exhibit a depth of risk-taking and relentlessness that supports making their dream come to life.

Read more at Entrepreneur.com